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The Human Toll

 

The vast scale of the Nazi program of mass murder is reflected in the fact that for many months in 1942, 1943 and 1944 the Nazis cold-bloodedly killed more than 100,000 people per week from all parts of Europe in the death camps, mainly Jews. About 5 million people from other groups — including Roma and Sinti (Gypsy) people, Poles, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Freemasons, political dissidents and people with intellectual and physical disabilities — were also targeted and murdered by the Nazis, albeit less systematically than in the case of the Jews.

The following table provides estimates of the numbers of Jewish inhabitants of each country under Nazi domination who were murdered, compared to the country’s pre-war Jewish population. 

 

Number of Jews who perished in the Holocaust by Country of Residence
Country Pre-War Jewish Population    Jewish Deaths (Est)
Austria 185,000 50,000
Belgium 65,700 28,900
Bulgaria 50,000 0
Czechoslovakia 207,260 147,650
Denmark 7,800 60
Estonia 4,500 1,750
Finland 2,000 7
France 350,000 77,320
Germany 566,000 138,000
Greece 77,380 63,500
Holland 140,000 100,000
Hungary 825,000 559,500
Italy 44,500 7,680
Latvia 91,500 70,750
Libya  30,000 712
Lithuania  168,000 141,500
Luxembourg 3,500 1,950
Norway 1,700 762
Poland 3,300,000 2,950,000
Romania 609,000 278,000
Tunisia 90,000 260
USSR 3,020,000 1,050,000
Yugoslavia 78,000 59,750
TOTAL 9,916,840 5,728,051